floodtide exhibited in Berlin

My video floodtide has been selected to be shown at the Gallery for Sustainable Art in Berlin as part of their 1.5 degrees international exhibition, running from 15 January – 12 March 2021. The exhibition is about whether or not we reach our climate goal and includes object, installation, photo, painting, video, and readings.

floodtide imagines a city in the near future when sea levels have risen significantly. What does it look like? How will we cope?

The composition process making the video was very complex. Nearly every scene has been composited from multiple sources requiring more than 500 individual sequences from original footage filmed around Adelaide, the Fleurieu Peninsula, Inner Suburban Melbourne, the Western Highway, and Far North Queensland. … Click here for more.

accidentals (recalculated) in Rochford Street Review

Rochford Street Review is a fabulous on-line journal highlighting Australian and International Literature, Art and Culture – with an emphasis on small press and grassroots cultural activities, run by the indefatigable Mark Roberts. So I’m super pleased that he has featured one of my more complex video poems accidentals (recalculated) in Issue 30 of the Review. This will be the first of five videos that will appear here.

The video was a finalist in the Carbon Culture Review 2016 Poetry Film Contest (USA); was exhibited at 17 Days (Day 9, Vol. 10) at The Bret Llewellyn Art Gallery, Alfred State College, NY (USA; August 28 – September 19, 2017) and Atrium Gallery, Western Michigan University (USA; November … Click here for more.

floodtide

What will our cities look like when sea levels rise amid the permanent consequences of climate change?

At last, here is the final version of my “floodtide” video. I first showed and performed it at the Paroxysm Press Showcase event at this year’s Adelaide Fringe Festival.

Nearly every scene in the video has been artificially composited and animated from multiple sources, comprising over 600 clips, originally filmed in various locations around the greater Adelaide area, the Fleurieu Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, inner city Melbourne and its Port, Far North Queensland, and more…

In conversation with Rosanna Licari, editor of StylusLit

StylusLit is an Australian, bi-annual online literary journal, publishing poetry, short fiction, novel excerpts, creative non-fiction, interviews and reviews. I had the great pleasure of being interviewed by editor Rosanna Licari about my writing practice and its relation to video poetry and more. I also have a poem based on my experiences living in Los Angeles in the early 80s.

An excerpt of the interview was republished on the Moving Poems website, along with an excerpt of another interview with video-poet Lucy English.

Click here to read the interview.

Click here to read the poem Vox Pops, LA ’82.

Click here to read the Moving Poems article.

A Skeleton of Desire

 

A Skeleton of Desire was published by Garron Publishing in October 2018 as part of their Southern-Land Poets Chapbook series.

It contains 10 poems that are mostly based on the human body in various ways – the organisation of the bones in the arms, their muscles, their development, dysfunction and recovery. Much of the imagery is derived from re-interpreting the original meanings of the latin names for body parts, diseases, and the environment they exist within.

Most of these poems have been previously published, with the five cardinal signs of inflammation and High Dependency originally appearing in the Medical Journal of Australia. Sensurious (Works on Paper) is derived from texts accompanying an exhibition of drawings by Judy Morris that … Click here for more.

making BLUE MOON

My video poem BLUE MOON, has generated quite some interest in how it was made.

The underlying sequence of buildings panning along to a beachscape is actually a single still image that I built in Photoshop. It is constructed from about 100 images of buildings around the Adelaide CBD, North Haven, and Brighton. They were photographed on days with bright sunshine and clear blue skies so that the lighting was comparable across the shots. Even so, I needed to adjust colour, brightness, saturation, scale, perspective and so on to get the visual mix right. The blue skies also allowed for easier compositing later on. In the final mix, the background sky was processed to be the same in all … Click here for more.